cross country – Lerner Sports Marketing http://lernersportsmarketing.com/ Tue, 01 Mar 2022 00:30:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/ICON.png cross country – Lerner Sports Marketing http://lernersportsmarketing.com/ 32 32 180-day road from Tokyo to Beijing Olympics takes dual-sport athletes down different paths https://lernersportsmarketing.com/180-day-road-from-tokyo-to-beijing-olympics-takes-dual-sport-athletes-down-different-paths/ Fri, 04 Feb 2022 21:31:43 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/180-day-road-from-tokyo-to-beijing-olympics-takes-dual-sport-athletes-down-different-paths/ A mixed Olympian who competes in both the Summer and Winter Olympics will typically have 18 months to train between Games. But the global pandemic has reduced this already grueling task to just 180 days. There were three athletes who competed in Tokyo in July/August last summer who had already competed in the 2018 Winter […]]]>

A mixed Olympian who competes in both the Summer and Winter Olympics will typically have 18 months to train between Games. But the global pandemic has reduced this already grueling task to just 180 days.

There were three athletes who competed in Tokyo in July/August last summer who had already competed in the 2018 Winter Olympics and had realistic chances of doing so again in Beijing.

Vincent De Haître from Canada (cycling and speed skating), Ayumu Hirano from Japan (skateboarding and snowboarding) and Pita Taufatofua from Tonga (taekwondo and cross-country skiing) all competed in Tokyo and had the opportunity to represent their country only six months later in Beijing.

But the paths taken by these three athletes after the end of the Tokyo Olympics diverged considerably.

De Haître is going through an unusual training cycle

Already a two-time Winter Olympian in 2014 and 2018 in the 1000m and 1500m long track speed skating events, De Haître helped Canadian cyclists set a personal best in the team pursuit and finish fifth at the Games Tokyo Olympics.

Canada’s Vincent de Haitre in action during the 2020 UCI Track Cycling World Championships. (Kacper Pempel/Reuters)

Being a dual-sport athlete takes its toll on the body, and the six-month turnaround took its toll on 27-year-old De Haître.

“With back and forth [between cycling and speed skating]Vince suffered several serious back injuries,” Aly Hodgins, physiotherapist for Cycling Canada, told Radio-Canada. “If we hadn’t managed them well, it could have been a problem in the future.”

It was a year before the Tokyo Olympics that De Haître decided he wanted to try to qualify in cycling, a sport in which he had competed internationally for seven years.

WATCH | De Haître embarks on a journey to compete in the Summer and Winter Olympics 6 months apart:

Tokyo today: Vincent De Haître

Two-time Olympian Vincent De Haître of Cumberland, Ont., says splitting his time between 2 sports, speed skating and track cycling, can be a challenge, but that’s what makes it so fun. 1:14

As De Haître wrote in May 2020, he wanted to “face this obstacle head-on and bet on myself as an athlete”, train for both sports and communicate with both national teams to achieve his goal. to participate in both Games.

“When I see him doing the warm-ups and stuff, I’m immediately like, ‘Oh, he’s doing weird stretches in speed skating or something,'” teammate Derek Gee told Radio-Canada. “He’s definitely a very different athlete to any of us. [on the cycling team]. I wouldn’t call him so much an outsider because he knows cycling very well.

“He’s been cycling his whole life, we were teammates together when we were really young, but he certainly has a different background than anyone else.”

Canadian Vincent De Haître slides down the track during the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press)

This path was short on the road to Beijing.

It all started in Calgary at the 2021 Canadian Long Track Championships in October, where De Haître battled a strained groin he suffered during warm-ups to finish second, an unthinkable feat considering he jumped from his bike to the Olympics just 72 days earlier.

“He was a bit ahead of what we expected,” Bart Schouten, coach of the Canadian long track speed skating team, told Radio-Canada after seeing De Haître on the ice for the first time. . “In testing in October, he outplayed some people who we knew skated really, really well.”

WATCH | De Haître prepares for the Winter Games:

Beijing today: Vincent De Haître

Ottawa multi-sport athlete and three-time Olympian Vincent De Haître is no stranger to competing on the biggest stage in the world. 1:38

Despite the effort, the competition for the Canadian team was fierce and the team from Cumberland, Ont. native finished just short of his goal of making the team when it was announced in mid-January.

“After leaving speed skating for three years, I went the distance with the best in this country and finished second at the Canadian Championships,” De Haître said on his Instagram after being named a non-traveling replacement for the 2022 Olympic team.” My World Cup results just weren’t what they needed to be, leaving me as an alternate for the 2022 Olympics.

“It’s a win for me! I took on an impossible challenge and fought hard until the end.”

Ayumu Hirano starts in Beijing

23-year-old Hirano had a nearly 20-year-old dream come true when he fell on his skateboard during the Tokyo Olympics.

While the Japan native rose to prominence on the slopes as a double silver medalist at the 2014 Sochi Games (when he achieved the feat of being the youngest Olympic medalist in snowboarding at just 15 ) and at the 2018 PyeongChang Games, he started skateboarding at the age of four, just before taking up snowboarding.

“Now that skateboarding has become an official event of the Tokyo 2020 Olympic and Paralympic Games, I couldn’t let it go,” Hirano told asahi.com in November 2018, just nine months after earning his second Olympic medal. money in snowboarding in PyeongChang. Games.

Ayumu Hirano of Japan competes in the men’s skate park preliminaries at the 2020 Summer Olympics in August. (Ben Curtis/Associated Press)

With the Tokyo Games being pushed back a year, it gave him more time to prepare for the inaugural skateboarding event at the Olympics, but it also delayed the start of his training for Beijing, which he has had ample opportunity to do while preparing for both. the 2014 and 2018 Games.

“There’s not a single day to lose,” Hirano told Olympics.com, less than a month after the Tokyo Games. “But I don’t feel like I’m against anybody. I feel like it’s about challenging me.”

Nonetheless, the Murakami native still enters the halfpipe competition as one of the favorites, alongside Australian Scotty James, Japanese Yuto Totsuka and 2018 US gold medalist Shaun White. He will also compete with his two younger brothers, Kaishu and Ruka.

Japan’s Ayumu Hirano competed in the United States Grand Prix snowboard event in December. (Hugh Carey/Associated Press)

“For a while, I’ve been away from snowboarding,” Hirano told USA Today after finishing 14th in skateboarding qualifying in Tokyo. “Everyone is at their highest level, and how I’m going to recover is a challenge.”

The snowboarding prodigy quickly warmed up heading into Beijing, landing the first-ever triple cork on the Dew Tour in December, and taking silver at the X Games in late January.

The shirtless flag bearer carries a noble cause in 2022

When the opening ceremony began Friday evening in Beijing, the absence of Taufatofua was already felt.

The shirtless Tongan flag bearer who has made a name for himself at each of the last three Olympic opening ceremonies unfortunately did not return to his role on Friday, but it was for an honorable reason.

On January 15, the Polynesian nation of Tonga was devastated by the eruption of an underwater volcano, causing damage to the archipelago and cutting communications with the country, delaying relief efforts.

WATCH | The eruption of an underwater volcano devastates Tonga:

New images show extensive damage from Tonga volcano eruption

Reconnaissance flights from Australia and New Zealand revealed the extent of the damage in Tonga from Saturday’s massive volcanic eruption and tsunami. Damage to airport and communication cables hamper relief efforts. 3:43

With the Beijing Games on the horizon, the direction for one of only two Tongan athletes to ever compete in the Winter Olympics was clear. Taufatofua quickly took to social media and launched a fundraiser which to date has reached over A$800,000 of its $1 million goal.

The three-time Olympian has quickly transformed the platform the Games have provided him since his first appearance at the 2016 Games in Rio de Janeiro into a vehicle for raising awareness of the natural disaster.

Pita Taufatofua of Tonga reacts during the Men’s Taekwondo Heavyweight +80kg competition at the Tokyo 2020 Olympics. (Murad Sezer/Reuters)

“I got a message from a lady in Japan, and she was like, ‘You waved at me at the Tokyo Olympics and now I’m returning the favor. [by donating]”,” Taufatofua told Olympics.com in mid-January. “And I sat there and I thought, I waved. I have to start saying hello to everyone.”

Although the Olympics are on the back burner for the 38-year-old, they are certainly not forgotten.

Tonga’s Pita Taufatofua (right) and Morocco’s Samir Azzimani embrace after the men’s 15km freestyle cross-country skiing event at the 2018 Pyeongchang Olympics. (Carlos Barria/Reuters)

“My focus right now is to make sure we can help rebuild Tonga and then my energies will go back to the Olympics,” he told Olympics.com.

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NESCAC Honors Seven Hamilton Fall Sports Athletes for Sportsmanship https://lernersportsmarketing.com/nescac-honors-seven-hamilton-fall-sports-athletes-for-sportsmanship/ Mon, 06 Dec 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/nescac-honors-seven-hamilton-fall-sports-athletes-for-sportsmanship/ History links Seven Hamilton College student-athletes have been selected to the 2021 NESCAC All-Sportsmanship Fall Team. NESCAC Sportsmanship Fall Team Launch The all-athlete team is comprised of one student-athlete representing each varsity sport from each school and is selected by coaches and student-athletes from each sport based on their positive contributions to sportsmanship. Student-athletes demonstrate […]]]>

Seven Hamilton College student-athletes have been selected to the 2021 NESCAC All-Sportsmanship Fall Team.

NESCAC Sportsmanship Fall Team Launch

The all-athlete team is comprised of one student-athlete representing each varsity sport from each school and is selected by coaches and student-athletes from each sport based on their positive contributions to sportsmanship. Student-athletes demonstrate respect for themselves, teammates, coaches, opponents, and spectators. Through their positive actions and examples, they inspire others to embrace the quality of sportsmanship that NESCAC and NCAA endorse.

Gambino Cat ’22 was a two-time winner of the NESCAC women’s conference soccer team.

Men’s Cross Country: Nick Lyons ’22 (Cumming, Ga./West Forsyth HS)
Women’s Cross Country: Betsy Overstrum ’24 (Wallingford, Connecticut/Choate Rosemary Hall)
Field hockey: Molly Banks ’22 (Mamaroneck, NY/Mamaroneck HS)
Soccer: Drew Granski ’22 (Ridgewood, NJ/Ridgewood HS)
Men’s football: Sam Dil ’22 (Williamstown, Mass./Mount Greylock Regional HS)
Women’s football : Gambino Cat 22 (Westbury, NY/Carle Place HS)
Volleyball: Jo Dine ’22 (New York, NY / Fieldston School)

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Notre Dame Fighting Irish Olympic Athletes Make an Impact https://lernersportsmarketing.com/notre-dame-fighting-irish-olympic-athletes-make-an-impact/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/notre-dame-fighting-irish-olympic-athletes-make-an-impact/ My buddies have always thought that having me get to talk to and be with Notre Dame football players every week was a pretty cool way to make a living, and they’re right. I am truly fortunate to hear and share the stories of these fabulous student-athletes who represent the most famous college football program […]]]>

My buddies have always thought that having me get to talk to and be with Notre Dame football players every week was a pretty cool way to make a living, and they’re right.

I am truly fortunate to hear and share the stories of these fabulous student-athletes who represent the most famous college football program in the world.

But as I reflected on this week over the Thanksgiving holiday and recounted all the people I’ve met and the places I’ve been on Notre Dame beat, I’ve realized that my exciting career opportunities aren’t exclusive. in Irish football.

As part of my coverage of Olympic sports for Illustrated blue and gold, I also met some of the most remarkable and inspiring young men and women in the country who are not called Brady Quinn, Ian Book or Kyren Williams.

Two-time Irish women’s football captain sammy fisher is finishing her master’s degree in nonprofit administration and plans to return home to Los Angeles after a professional football career to get involved and help alleviate the city’s homelessness crisis.

Graduate student Yared Nuguse, an American Olympian and NCAA record holder in the 1,500 meters, is one of many Irish athletes grateful for the opportunity to return to Notre Dame for another year of camaraderie and competition after the isolation of a pandemic year. (Courtesy of Notre Dame Athletics)

Notre Dame Golfer Laurent Beaudreau is an American academic star who plans to become a television golf analyst when his LPGA career is over.

Nuguse Yared – an Irish cross-country star, national long-distance running champion and All-ACC varsity artist – graduated in the spring but put his dentistry on hold so he could return to Notre Dame as a graduate student and compete for one more year.

Nuguse turned that decision into a second straight ACC outdoor championship in the 1,500 meters and a spot last summer on the U.S. Olympic team in Tokyo.

These three are a tiny sample of the remarkable, unique and dedicated student-athletes I have had the good fortune to meet and share stories with.

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While many athletes in ticketed sports such as football and basketball are often eager to leave campus, Nuguse is one of many Irish Olympic athletes who were eager to return for another year of school and sport after the NCAA provided additional eligibility due to the pandemic.

“My time at Notre Dame meant the world to me,” Nuguse explained in retrospect. “And being isolated because of COVID made me realize how much more it really meant. I wanted to come back and leave on a good note, because I knew that moment was coming and I wouldn’t have that anymore. I will really miss my team and all the friendships I made here. »

Charley Niego – a Notre Dame women’s volleyball star who will graduate in May as a four-time All-ACC winner and one of the most accomplished players in Irish history – explained that she wishes her time and his legacy here are measured by his personal growth off the pitch more than his thousands of victims and digs into it.

“The most important thing that I want to be remembered after my time at Notre Dame is just to be a good person and a good teammate to everyone,” Niego explained. “After that, I also want to be remembered as a player who helped change the culture of Notre Dame and made Notre Dame volleyball what it is today and in the future. ‘to come up.”

Irish junior golfer Jackson Palm – high school National Honor Society member and All-ACC Academic Team winner – specializes in business analysis, knowing that when his professional pursuits end as a player, he’ll be ready for life beyond birdies.

“I try to become as complete as possible while I’m here and take advantage of all the opportunities Notre Dame gives me,” he said. “I realize and appreciate that my experiences in golf here will open more doors for me later.”

The unexpected death in April of Lou Somogyi — our esteem Illustrated blue and gold editor, colleague, mentor and dear friend — gave me a new perspective on life and work when he left us.

As part of his weekly routine, Lou would step away from his Irish football duties and brief staff on all the other important games, fixtures and matches taking place on campus which were not going to attract the attention that they deserved.

Lou freely admitted and always insisted that just because we don’t have the space in the magazine to adequately celebrate these often anonymous and always unheralded student-athletes, the special young men and women who compete in these secondary sports are much more than a cover page. news, they are actually the fabric of Notre Dame.

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Tigers Honor Fall Sports Athletes at Banquet https://lernersportsmarketing.com/tigers-honor-fall-sports-athletes-at-banquet/ Mon, 08 Nov 2021 08:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/tigers-honor-fall-sports-athletes-at-banquet/ Receiving special honors at the Crothersville Fall Awards Program were, front from left, Makenna Newberry, Dirk Crater, Elayna Ord and Kaylyn Holman; the back row is Pearl Shirley, Kennadi Lakins, Ella Plasse, Haley Williams and Tori Reed. Arv Koontz | The Tribune CROTHERSVILLE — Members of Crothersville’s high and middle school volleyball and cross-country teams […]]]>

CROTHERSVILLE — Members of Crothersville’s high and middle school volleyball and cross-country teams were honored during an awards program at the school last week.

CHS athletic director Jacob Dunn said, “I’m doing what I can for the athletic department” and thanked the coaches for their hard work.

Dunn introduced the coaches who, in turn, presented special letters and awards to their team members.

Assistant volleyball coach Rita Cook said, “They (the volleyball girls) put in a lot of work in the spring and summer.”

Cook said the Tigers attended Munciana’s volleyball camp in Muncie this summer and were able to purchase new uniforms through their fundraiser.

College volleyball coach Carly Blevins said her team started the season playing four games in Scottsburg on Aug. 14 and then beating Columbus Christian the following Monday.

The Tigers were then unable to play for two weeks (5 games) due to being quarantined by COVID-19. The junior varsity members had other issues with COVID and weren’t able to play a full season.

Crothersville (4-14) lost in the first round of the section to Trinity Lutheran, who finished second in the Class 1A state tournament.

Senior Ella Plasse received the Tiger Mental Attitude Award.

“The Tiger Award is given to someone who demonstrates exceptional sportsmanship,” Blevins said. “Ella has improved throughout the year.”

Kennadi Lakins was named to the Southern Athletic All-Conference First Team and received the Strike Award, Haley Williams was named Most Improved and McKenna Newberry received the Setter Award.

Pearl Shirley received the service reception trophy and Elayna Ord was the service award recipient.

Tori Reed was named Most Improved Junior College Player, Kaylee Caudill received the Service Receiving Award, and Plasse received the JV Service Award.

Cross Country Coach Carl Bowman introduced the men’s and women’s team members.

Dirk Crater was named the Most Outstanding Rider for Boys with Andrew Stainbrook receiving the Tiger Award.

Crater qualified for regional, and Bowman said it was the second straight year a freshman boy has qualified for regional.

Plasse and Lakins played volleyball and ran cross-country.

Plasse received the Tiger Award for Girls and was also named Most Improved.

“Ella was a great teammate and role model, and she qualified for the region,” Bowman said.

He said Kaylyn Holman was again named Most Outstanding Runner. She was the Southern Athletic Conference champion five consecutive years (including eighth year).

Holman and Plasse finished 1-2 in the SAC race.

Holman was a state qualifier his freshman and junior years.

“I’m blessed to have her running for me,” Bowman said. “She made me look good. She won so many races for Crothersville. I’m sure she has a lot of trophies back home.

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Adrian Boys Football and Cross Country Enjoying Dual Sport Athletes https://lernersportsmarketing.com/adrian-boys-football-and-cross-country-enjoying-dual-sport-athletes/ Thu, 02 Sep 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/adrian-boys-football-and-cross-country-enjoying-dual-sport-athletes/ ADRIAN – Dual sport in any sporting season is difficult. As players move up the ranks from prep sports to college sports to pros, it becomes increasingly rare. In high school however, one bond between teams that worked for Adrian in fall sports was the bond between his men’s soccer and cross country teams, as […]]]>

ADRIAN – Dual sport in any sporting season is difficult.

As players move up the ranks from prep sports to college sports to pros, it becomes increasingly rare.

In high school however, one bond between teams that worked for Adrian in fall sports was the bond between his men’s soccer and cross country teams, as over the years there have been a number of regular best runners who have worn their football kits. as much as their cross-country uniforms.

“We’ve been working and adjusting our schedule a bit to allow our athletes from both sports to get involved as much as they can,” said Adrian’s boys soccer coach Ted Hanosh. “There are times when they are a little late for practice and like any other kid, if they know they have a conflict, we try to adjust the schedule so we can keep as many people as possible in training.”

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West Salem football experiences the value of athletes from all three sports | Sports https://lernersportsmarketing.com/west-salem-football-experiences-the-value-of-athletes-from-all-three-sports-sports/ Fri, 06 Aug 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/west-salem-football-experiences-the-value-of-athletes-from-all-three-sports-sports/ West Salem, Wis. (WXOW) West Salem is hoping for a comeback program on the rise. They didn’t win a game in 2019 but went 3-1 in the COVID-shortened season last fall. The Panthers fire 13 starters from this team. One thing West Salem is proud of is the number of athletes from three sports on […]]]>

West Salem, Wis. (WXOW) West Salem is hoping for a comeback program on the rise.

They didn’t win a game in 2019 but went 3-1 in the COVID-shortened season last fall.

The Panthers fire 13 starters from this team.

One thing West Salem is proud of is the number of athletes from three sports on its roster.

This helped bring the team together as they went through many battles together.

“When you play three sports you use more muscle groups than any one sport specific so it helps with injuries and keeps you well balanced and it also creates a better relationship with your team mates and brothers. on the team,” senior running back/linebacker CJ McConkey said.

“We have a lot of different athletes who come here because of the three sports athletes and that means we’re deep in every position, so I personally think that makes us a really tough football team. We have a lot of big guys the wrestlers that are on the line the linebackers just strong guys we got cross country runners really fast receivers yeah we just deep pretty much everywhere,” said lead receiver/cornerback Jack Hehli.

West Salem will put that depth to the test in their season opener with GET.

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Hawkeye’s Unpaid Sports Athletes Struggle During NIL’s First Weeks https://lernersportsmarketing.com/hawkeyes-unpaid-sports-athletes-struggle-during-nils-first-weeks/ Tue, 20 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/hawkeyes-unpaid-sports-athletes-struggle-during-nils-first-weeks/ While the new NIL rules can bring millions to the biggest stars in college sports, other athletes are getting creative to take advantage of the new laws. Hannah Kinson Iowa forward Leah Zellner puts the ball in play during the fourth quarter of the Big Ten field hockey tournament semifinals against No. 1 Michigan on […]]]>

While the new NIL rules can bring millions to the biggest stars in college sports, other athletes are getting creative to take advantage of the new laws.

Hannah Kinson

Iowa forward Leah Zellner puts the ball in play during the fourth quarter of the Big Ten field hockey tournament semifinals against No. 1 Michigan on Thursday, April 22, 2021 at Grant Field. With five minutes left in the game, Iowa pulled their goaltender to replace the position with another player on offense. The Hawkeyes were beaten by the Wolverines, 0-2. Michigan will continue to play No. 7 Ohio State in the championships on Saturday.


Many Hawkeyes have taken advantage of their name, image and likeness by selling merchandise, signing autographs and signing endorsement deals since the NCAA began allowing such behavior in early July. At least, those who already had a sequel.

Iowa wrestler and three-time national champion Spencer Lee teamed up with Ironside Style Apparel in Cedar Rapids to sell exclusive merchandise, and Hawkeye football catcher Tyrone Tracy Jr. hosted an event at Graze Restaurant in Iowa City to sign autographs.

While Lee and Tracy already have name recognition in the Iowa City community, it’s harder for Hawkeye student-athletes in nonprofit sports to gain similar identification.

Field hockey is a popular sport in Europe, Australia and the East Coast of the United States, so only three players on Hawkeye’s roster are from the Midwest. The University of Iowa is home to the only Division I field hockey team in the state.

“It’s a lot harder for us because field hockey isn’t very common in the United States, especially here in Iowa,” said field hockey senior Leah Zellner. “A lot of us don’t have a lot of followers like a footballer or a basketball player, but there are people I know who work [toward an endorsement].”

Lee has 113,000 followers on Instagram and an average of over 20,000 likes per post, while Zellner has around 1,600 Instagram followers.

But Hawkeye softball, field hockey, soccer and cross-country athletes can still enjoy name, image and likeness rights, whether they appear in ads for small businesses or work as brand influencers.

Many Hawkeyes have become Barstool Athletes – a program launched by Barstool Sports, a sports and pop culture digital media company. Different universities have different Barstool accounts, including Barstool Hawkeyes.

RELATED: Name, Image, Likeness: A New Era for College Athletes

Student-athletes in all of Iowa’s sports are now bar stool athletes, including Lee, sophomore softball Sammy Diaz, senior men’s basketball Connor McCaffery and senior women’s football player Skylar Alward.

While the new NIL rules just took effect on July 1, Hawkeye student-athletes are still considering their options in the first month of the new opportunities.

Iowa Athletics launched a comprehensive name, image and likeness program – named FLIGHT – to help Hawkeye student-athletes understand the inner workings of NIL. Iowa athletes also attended compliance meetings before NIL went into effect to ensure any agreement will be in line with university policy.

“I do not have [engaged in NIL deals] yet, because it’s still pretty new,” Zellner said. “And I think a lot of us have still thought and learned about that, so we’re still compliant… We’re both learning as we go, but the university is there to help us, and we’ve been on calls already goes through the rules.

Social media has become popular with influencers who make money from brand deals and advertising, and Iowa athletes in both revenue and non-profit sports can use it to their advantage.

Some Hawkeye athletes, like women’s soccer captain Sara Wheaton, aren’t on social media often. Wheaten said she doesn’t want to use the new NIL rules to gain an audience and make money from ad revenue.

“I have TikTok and that’s about it so I personally wouldn’t do anything like that,” Wheaton said. “But I know there are girls on the team who want to use social media to reach out and grow their brands.”

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Multi-sport athletes lead busy lives https://lernersportsmarketing.com/multi-sport-athletes-lead-busy-lives/ Wed, 14 Jul 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/multi-sport-athletes-lead-busy-lives/ “I push myself to the limit,” Smith said. “Some people say it’s bad. It’s funny. I love it. It’s tiring. But that’s what I do. I am a multi-sport athlete. Sport is my life. Sundays are my days off. I’m not doing anything. “He’s a great kid who’s easy to coach,” Ceres High athletics head […]]]>

“I push myself to the limit,” Smith said. “Some people say it’s bad. It’s funny. I love it. It’s tiring. But that’s what I do. I am a multi-sport athlete. Sport is my life. Sundays are my days off. I’m not doing anything.

“He’s a great kid who’s easy to coach,” Ceres High athletics head coach Brett Johnson said. “He’s always smiling.”

Smith won gold medals while competing at the Western Athletic Conference track and field championships on May 15 at Patterson Community Stadium.

A newcomer to the sport, Smith set personal bests sweeping the 100 (11.25) and 200 (23.00) in the men’s finals.

“For him to be able to do that is pretty special,” Johnson said.

“Competition has motivated me to do better than everyone else,” added Smith. “I surprised myself with the times I put up. As a sprinter, you need to stay relaxed. If you’re tense, you’re not going to run the times you want to run.

Smith also teamed with Gonzalo Rivera, Samar Singh and Luis Yepez to finish in third place in the 4×400 relay (3:41.15).

Smith was named to the Western Athletic Conference South Division first team in men’s volleyball.

He was rewarded for leading the Bulldogs to a 4-0 league record.

Smith was a WAC honorable mention selection in ninth grade.

A receiver in every football league, Smith helped Ceres High break its first unbeaten record in 16 years.

He caught 16 passes for 348 yards and three touchdowns as the Bulldogs went 2-2 overall and finished fourth in the WAC South standings.

Smith ranked first on the team in all three offensive categories.

He rushed for 198 yards and two touchdowns, both team highs, on 20 carries.

He also completed 10 of 17 passes for 160 yards with a touchdown and an interception.

“Verlis has done a lot of good things this year,” said head coach Clinton Goblirsch. “He was our go-to guy on the outside. He made plays for us when we needed him.

“He wants to succeed in everything he does,” he added.

Smith likely would have received full conference recognition in men’s basketball had he played all season.

He missed both games against top-placed Los Banos after being placed in COVID quarantine for the second time.

The Bulldogs finished second in the WAC South standings (5-3).

Smith averaged 11.7 points and 7.3 rebounds per game.

He scored a team-high 19 points in a non-league game against the mighty Modesto Christian.

“He (Smith) was our best player this year,” Ceres High Boys basketball head coach TJ Walker said.

“Verlis is a workaholic,” he added. “He’s versatile with his size, strength and speed… Big things are expected of him (next year).”

Espinoza played softball, volleyball and wrestling in his senior year at Central Valley.

She had a 4.7 GPA and was enrolled in four advanced placement classes.

Espinoza also has a part-time job.

“It was pretty hectic,” she said. “There were days when I practiced three sports at the same time. There were points I wanted to give up. I kept pushing because I wanted to end the year strong.

“My coaches were flexible,” Espinoza added. “They let me leave practice early or skip it if I had a lot of homework to catch up on.”

Espinoza’s last year of wrestling consisted of only two scrums due to COVID-19 safety and transportation concerns.

“Wrestling was my favorite sport,” said Espinoza, who competed in the heavyweight division. “That’s where my mental strength comes from. It pushed me where I had never gone before.

“Sammy has a great attitude,” Central Valley coach Rob Beckhart said. “She works very hard. She’s not one to back down from a challenge. She’s done a lot for our program. I can’t say enough good things about her.

Espinoza assisted with the opening goal as the 8-7 Central Valley softball team posted a league winning record for the first time in program history this spring.

She hit .390 with a home run, two doubles, eight RBIs and 11 runs.

Espinoza played seven combined seasons of college softball and volleyball for head coach Regina Selfridge.

“It was such a fun experience,” Espinoza said. “She helped me improve in both sports. She helped bring out my confidence. She was my mentor. She was also my teacher. We are quite close.

“Sammy is really sweet and always positive,” Selfridge said. “He’s someone you want to be with.”

Julia Roton from Central Valley (softball, volleyball and wrestling), Kylie Maines (softball, volleyball and wrestling) and Soriah Corona (softball, volleyball and wrestling), and Bethanie Thornberry from Ceres High (golf, softball and volleyball), Jazmyne Arendt (golf, volleyball and softball), Dominique Arendt (golf, volleyball and softball), Ryan Ashby (basketball, baseball, football and cross country) and Samar Singh (football, basketball and track and field) all competed in three or more sports during the 2020-21 school year.

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St. Clair cross country will rely on multi-sport athletes in 2021 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/st-clair-cross-country-will-rely-on-multi-sport-athletes-in-2021/ Tue, 29 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/st-clair-cross-country-will-rely-on-multi-sport-athletes-in-2021/ The revelation for St. Clair cross country coach Tom Brenner wasn’t the brace that Jack Pennewell and Andrew Parr recorded in the Division 2 regional split last fall. Nor was it how the Saints topped the scoresheet en route to winning the championship in Algonac and advancing to their 21st straight state finals, which is […]]]>

The revelation for St. Clair cross country coach Tom Brenner wasn’t the brace that Jack Pennewell and Andrew Parr recorded in the Division 2 regional split last fall.

Nor was it how the Saints topped the scoresheet en route to winning the championship in Algonac and advancing to their 21st straight state finals, which is still Michigan’s best streak, regardless. or division.

The now fourth-year coach was actually more surprised that Sam Vitale and Carter Bollard finished just half a second behind Croswell-Lexington’s James Elling. Had they finished a second earlier, it would have given the Saints a double in a competition featuring strong rivals, such as Yale and Armada, as well as top individual runners, such as Cros-Lex’s Elling and Matthew Westbrook. . and Conner Uppleger of Marine City.

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SIDE: Multi-sport athletes abound at Cherokee High https://lernersportsmarketing.com/side-multi-sport-athletes-abound-at-cherokee-high/ Thu, 10 Jun 2021 07:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/side-multi-sport-athletes-abound-at-cherokee-high/ By SCOTT MCKIE BP One-feather staff Several weeks ago I took photos of Jonathan Frady competing in a track meet at Cherokee High School (CHS). Then, less than an hour after it ended, I snapped pictures of him pitching six innings in a campus baseball game. In the last decades that I’ve covered sports at […]]]>

By SCOTT MCKIE BP

One-feather staff

Several weeks ago I took photos of Jonathan Frady competing in a track meet at Cherokee High School (CHS). Then, less than an hour after it ended, I snapped pictures of him pitching six innings in a campus baseball game.

In the last decades that I’ve covered sports at the CHS, it’s been the norm rather than the exception for student-athletes to compete in more than one sport – some in the same season. This academic year alone, I covered Frady, a recent CHS honors graduate, in several sports, including football, basketball, track and field, and baseball.

Jonathan Frady, a recent CHS honorary graduate, pitches a baseball game at Cherokee High School less than an hour after competing in a track meet. He also participated in football and basketball at the CHS. (photos SCOTT MCKIE BP/One Feather)

The same is true for boys and girls. Jaylynne Esquivel, one of the area’s top track and cross-country runners, is also a wrestler on the school’s varsity team.

Many of the CHS athletes participate in many sports for several reasons. First and foremost, it’s a very small school and there are a limited number of athletes. Second, many do it to stay in shape and maintain their competitive edge.

Hockey legend Wayne Gretzky once said, “I’ve played it all. I played lacrosse, baseball, hockey, soccer, track and field. I was convinced that you played hockey in the winter and when the season was over you hung up your skates and played something else.

The Michigan High School Athletic Association released survey results several years ago that found that 43% of student-athletes in the state participated in more than one sport. And those rates increased as school size decreased, with Class D schools (equivalent to 1A schools in North Carolina) reporting the highest rate at 61.8%.

The National Federation of State High School Associations (NFHS) actually encourages multi-sport participation and discourages specialization in a single sport. Information from the organization states: “A study by the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, which included more than 1,500 high school athletes, found that sports-specialized athletes were twice as likely to report a lower extremity injury compared to those who played multiple sports.

Jaylynne Esquivel runs en route to a second-place finish at the 1A Cross Country Championship in January. She also competes in athletics and college wrestling.

He continued: “Another recent study published in the American Journal of Sports Medicine has even higher numbers, claiming that spending more than eight months a year in a sport leaves young athletes almost three times more likely to suffer a excessive hip or knee injury. .”

The NFHS also indicates that participating in multiple sports can have lasting positive effects beyond high school. “In a study of over 14,000 12and students, young athletes who participated in multiple sports as children were found to be more likely to exhibit healthier behaviors later in life, such as exercising vigorously every day, getting at least seven hours of sleep regularly, be less likely to smoke and be more likely to eat green vegetables. They also seem to have higher levels of self-esteem and social support, and lower levels of loneliness and self-mockery.

While all of these are great reasons to participate in multiple sports, one important aspect that cannot be overlooked is the student-athlete’s sheer desire to stay busy and competitive in a variety of settings.

Whatever the reason, it’s great to see young Cherokee athletes competing, having fun and being healthy.

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