Sport athletes – Lerner Sports Marketing http://lernersportsmarketing.com/ Sat, 07 May 2022 16:31:25 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/01/ICON.png Sport athletes – Lerner Sports Marketing http://lernersportsmarketing.com/ 32 32 UJ is home to many multi-sport athletes – Jamestown Sun https://lernersportsmarketing.com/uj-is-home-to-many-multi-sport-athletes-jamestown-sun/ Sat, 07 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/uj-is-home-to-many-multi-sport-athletes-jamestown-sun/ JAMESTOWN – Jamestown University is home to many multi-sport athletes, three of whom are Isaiah Roebuck, Chris Sayler and Peyton Oelrich. Roebuck is a freshman outfielder and pitcher on the baseball team and plays wide receiver on the football team. Sayler is a sophomore running back on the football team and runs sprints and jumps […]]]>

JAMESTOWN – Jamestown University is home to many multi-sport athletes, three of whom are Isaiah Roebuck, Chris Sayler and Peyton Oelrich.

Roebuck is a freshman outfielder and pitcher on the baseball team and plays wide receiver on the football team. Sayler is a sophomore running back on the football team and runs sprints and jumps for the track team. Oelrich is a freshman hitter on the football team and outfielder on the softball team.

While some athletes come with the intention of playing multiple sports, Roebuck said that’s not the case for him.

“I was originally recruited as a football player, but because I also played baseball, my head football coach (Brian Mistro) introduced me to the head baseball coach (Tom Hager)” , said Roebuck. “After that, I was also recruited to play baseball.”

Sayler’s two-sport course is a bit different than Roebuck’s. Sayler, a Jamestown native, planned to run track and play football for the Jimmies.

“Coming into freshman year, I was recruited for both athletics and football,” Sayler said. “I guess I just started playing football and at the end of the football season the athletics coach contacted me and said they still want me to do athletics. So they convinced me and I wanted to do it, so I did it.

As athletic director, Austin Hieb appreciates the number of dual-sport athletes on UJ’s campus and said the competitive spirit brings a lot to the campus and the outside community as a whole.

“Competitively, that’s one of the reasons a lot of coaches say they like dual-sport athletes simply because they like kids who like competition,” Hieb said. “So if you have a multi-sport athlete on your team, obviously that’s someone who is looking for competition, who loves competition and you can never have enough people around you who love competition. So I think that having athletes who thrive in competition is valuable to the community.”

The trio faced the struggle to balance their respective sports and academics with the offseason for each overlapping the respective seasons. Oelrich said she was forced to focus on one sport as the schedule became hectic.

“Sometimes it’s hard to balance the two just because the practices are often at the same time,” Oelrich said. “I ended up quitting football completely for a few weeks, and then as softball went deeper into the season, I started doing one or two football practices a week. Basically, when softball n I’m not here anymore, I’m going to soccer.

In addition to athletes working to stay organized, coaches need to coordinate in order to make the best use of the athlete’s time. Mistro said communication between himself, track and field coach Andrew Raske and Hager must be paramount to the athletes’ success.

“If we’re all on the same page, then it’s going great,” Mistro said. “If we’re not all on the same page, it’s an up-and-down battle over where are they at in training this week and what they’re up to next week and where are they going in the week. For us, it’s just about making sure we’re all on the same page and we’re all getting along pretty well, so it works out pretty well.

One of the unique challenges Oelrich faces is that the skills are different to be good at soccer or softball.

“My skills for either sport don’t help the other much outside of the racing aspect,” Oelrich said. “I think softball has helped my reaction time and hopefully it will help me time runs for football.”

Sayler said the overlapping spring seasons make juggling the two sports a little more difficult. Sayler said the running track helped him on the field.

“The track is really useful, just the speed and the explosiveness and it’s good to translate that into football,” Sayler said.

Roebuck is not the only baseball-football Jimmie of the Hager era as he was preceded by Jeff Nold, Danny White, Max Boe and Cade Torgerson.

“We’ve had great baseball-football players in the past. … We’ve had guys who have been able to do both,” Hager said. “They did it because they are good athletes and because they know how to balance their schedules.”

While some of the teams accommodate more dual-sport athletes than others, Sayler said his enjoyment is hanging out with a larger group of people than if he were just playing one sport.

“My favorite part is the competition and just the camaraderie with the teams,” Sayler said. “It’s fun being on two teams, it’s twice as many people you get to know, twice as many coaches you work with. They’re two different sports, so it’s fun to be able to compete in two things like that, especially in college.

Oelrich’s athleticism is so high that she started playing softball in her senior year of high school, and it blossomed into a love of the sport.

“I know I’m better at soccer just because I’ve been playing it for so long and that’s what I came here for initially, but I really like softball more,” Oelrich said.

Chris Sayler (2) is running back for the Jimmies. John M. Steiner / The Jamestown Sun

John M. Steiner

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College football coaches like to recruit athletes from three sports https://lernersportsmarketing.com/college-football-coaches-like-to-recruit-athletes-from-three-sports/ Thu, 05 May 2022 09:45:07 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/college-football-coaches-like-to-recruit-athletes-from-three-sports/ Editor’s note: Collin Dixon has agreed to give readers a glimpse into what goes into recruiting and the daily trials and tribulations of being one of the most sought after players in Division I college football. Below is the second d a series of journal-like entries written by Tallmadge junior. Finding Collin: Playing three sports […]]]>

Editor’s note: Collin Dixon has agreed to give readers a glimpse into what goes into recruiting and the daily trials and tribulations of being one of the most sought after players in Division I college football. Below is the second d a series of journal-like entries written by Tallmadge junior.

Finding Collin: Playing three sports

Growing up, I always practiced several sports.

I started to appreciate it more by seeing the impact they had on my recruitment process and what I learned from each of them.

A lot of coaches I’ve spoken to love seeing rookies play multiple sports like baseball, basketball, wrestling, track and field, etc. That’s because it allows them to go watch games in winter and spring sports to see how you move, compete, and act as a teammate in person rather than just on film.

More from Collin Dixon:Tallmadge star Collin Dixon learns college football recruiting is a full-time gig

I think playing multiple sports is something all athletes should do. In my case, I play soccer in the fall, basketball in the winter, and run in the spring.

Multisport athletes are able to improve their speed, agility, strength, and athleticism without doing the repetitive drills that characterize the offseason.

There are benefits to being versatile

Playing several sports allowed me to not burn out like some people who play and train for one sport all year round.

Different sports also teach you lessons that you can use in real life. It also allows you to be coached and learn from many different people with different coaching styles, expectations, and how to adapt to each, as well as giving you different team aspects.

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UGA study speaks to the dangers of a sport’s athletes – WGAU https://lernersportsmarketing.com/uga-study-speaks-to-the-dangers-of-a-sports-athletes-wgau/ Wed, 04 May 2022 09:11:44 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/uga-study-speaks-to-the-dangers-of-a-sports-athletes-wgau/ High school students who focus on one sport are more likely to be injured or suffer from burnout. But new research from the University of Georgia suggests their motivation to specialize in a sport is pure: a love of the game and competition. Published in the Orthopedic Journal of Sports Medicine, the study surveyed 975 […]]]>

High school students who focus on one sport are more likely to be injured or suffer from burnout. But new research from the University of Georgia suggests their motivation to specialize in a sport is pure: a love of the game and competition.

Published in the Orthopedic Journal of Sports Medicine, the study surveyed 975 high school athletes in the United States and found that more than one in five reported a high level of specialization in a sport. More than 42% declared a low level of specialization.

“A number of studies have pointed out that if you specialize in one sport, for example if you only play baseball or only play football, you do the same moves over and over again, there’s so a lot of problems with repetitive use injuries,” said Dee Warmath, lead author of the study and assistant professor at the College of Family and Consumer Sciences. “Other studies have pointed out that there are also an association with burnout. You want young adults to be engaged in their sport, and there are a lot of benefits to that. But if you just play football all year round, you’re likely to burn out and give up the sport.

Experts often recommend limiting athletic specialization, especially among high school athletes. Prior to this study, little was known about the motivations that drive high school athletes to specialize. Knowing what motivates your child to want to major in a sport can help parents and coaches develop a playbook to inspire the student to diversify.

“We might need a more balanced approach to managing sport specialization when athletes are taking it on for really positive reasons,” said Warmath, who is based in the Department of Financial Planning, Housing and Health. consumption economy. “So instead of saying that sports specialization is bad and you shouldn’t do it, maybe it’s more about finding ways to compete more effectively and pointing out that even some professional athletes use other sports to train for their main sport.This diversity of sports can make you better at your main sport.

The key, Warmath said, is finding ways to communicate to athletes why specialization might have negative consequences and what they can do to avoid them.

The study looked at two characteristics of competitiveness: the enjoyment of competition, which one might associate with a love of the game or higher levels of sportsmanship, and the adversarial nature of competition. Competitive and controversial athletes are more likely to be competitive in all aspects of their lives, which can manifest as more aggressive and antagonizing attitudes.

The researchers found that athletes who planned to play a sport in college were much more likely to have a high level of specialization. Athletes who enjoyed competition were also more likely to specialize.

Athletes who engaged in a variety of sports were more likely to show characteristics of opposites, such as challenging or arguing with other people even if it leads to conflict or hurt feelings. More athletic efforts give them more opportunities to compete.

“It’s like telling someone they might get wreckage while driving, so they shouldn’t drive because they won’t get wreckage that way,” Warmath said. “We have to recognize that athletes go into sport specialization for really positive reasons: they want to improve in their sport. They want to compete more effectively.

The study was funded in part by a Mind Matters Challenge grant from the National Collegiate Athletic Association/US Department of Defense. David R. Bell and Andrew P. Winterstein are co-authors of the article.

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Park City baseball team bolstered by dual-sport athletes https://lernersportsmarketing.com/park-city-baseball-team-bolstered-by-dual-sport-athletes/ Tue, 03 May 2022 12:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/park-city-baseball-team-bolstered-by-dual-sport-athletes/ Jake Farnell ends and throws a pitch in Park City’s game against Highland earlier in the season. Farnell pitches for the Park City baseball team and also plays on the boys’ tennis team.Park Record File Photo Park City High School sophomore Will McCurdy hit a grounder against Skyline’s third baseman during the Miners’ game last […]]]>

Jake Farnell ends and throws a pitch in Park City’s game against Highland earlier in the season. Farnell pitches for the Park City baseball team and also plays on the boys’ tennis team.
Park Record File Photo

Park City High School sophomore Will McCurdy hit a grounder against Skyline’s third baseman during the Miners’ game last Wednesday, then ran as fast as his legs carried him toward first base. It’s no secret that McCurdy has wheels — he’s currently a sprinter on the track team and also plays running back for the football team — and he ended up beating the pitch at first by a fraction of a second.

A batter later, McCurdy flew over base to score in a fourth-inning three-run that helped the Miners win 8-7 that day.

Junior Jake Farnell also made an appearance on the mound during this game. A day earlier, he was playing second doubles for the Park City men’s tennis team. Park City’s baseball team started 14-5 heading into Tuesday’s game against Olympus, and it helps to have a pair of athletes good enough to play on two different varsity teams at the same time.



“Will is really fast, and we support him because he’s really fast,” Park City baseball coach David Feasler said. “Jake Farnell is a good arm and a reliever arm that we’ve relied on a lot and he’s had a lot of games. And he also loves tennis, and I will always support that. I want our kids to be good adults, and I think the more things you do when you’re young, the better off you are personally.

The baseball, track and tennis schedules don’t overlap too much, so it’s been manageable.



“Will missed a few practices to run in a few meets, and Jake missed a few things here and there, but they did a really good job managing both schedules,” Feasler said. “I think it’s a very difficult thing for a 16-year-old to do, and they did a good job.”

In McCurdy, the Miners have a player who ran the 100 yards in 11.25 seconds at the Tiger Trials in Orem on Saturday. Park City have been aggressive on baseline, stealing 58 team goals this week. McCurdy was at the forefront with a team record 13.

McCurdy was used primarily as a pinch runner last season and struggled at home plate when given the chance. However, he has proven himself to be more than a baserunner this year. He’s more comfortable at home plate and gets on base a lot more often, giving him more opportunities to wreak havoc on base paths.

“If you look at last year, I had about 12, 14 at bats, batted like .150,” he said. “It was bad. My swing was all over the place, I was under everything. And then this year in the offseason I worked pretty hard to work on my swing and get it up to standard. I’m now batting (in the) 300, so I think it’s pretty much paying off.

While McCurdy runs the basics with ease, the running track is a bit different, mainly with the distance he has to run. The distance between two bases is much shorter than 100 yards, and McCurdy believes the shorter distances in the game of baseball are more of its strengths. He is still working on his running form, as he described watching him sprint as “a little painful”.

“Running 100 yards, I’m halfway there and I’m like, ‘When is this going to end?'” McCurdy said. “I’m really good in fast bursts, and towards the end I just see people catching me. Here it’s good because I’m only running 90 feet so I don’t really have time to slow down.

Will McCurdy slips home to score a point for Park City in their home game against Skyline last week. McCurdy also runs track in addition to playing baseball.
David Jackson/Park Recording

For Farnell, playing tennis is just a recent development. Park City boys’ tennis coach Justin DeLong saw a lot of potential in Farnell’s game in his limited time with the sport.

“Jake has gone from not playing or taking any lessons, I believe, in his life to then starting tennis last June,” DeLong said. “He has come a very long way not only in his technique but also in understanding the game and where to move and double down strategy. I think he’s come a long way, I’m super proud of him and I’m excited because he’s in it.

Farnell said he decided to play tennis one day because his sister played. While it’s easy to see how McCurdy’s speed can transfer to baseball, Farnell’s baseball-tennis combination might seem a bit odd at first. But it turns out throwing and tennis have some common attributes and movements, especially with serves.

“From throw to serve, it’s a similar move,” Farnell said. “After training because I loved the sport, I was able to understand very quickly.”

DeLong also saw the similarities.

“There’s a natural throwing motion that Jake has from baseball that has absolutely helped him with his tennis,” he said. “You can tell he’s thrown a lot in his life because it’s the same movement, especially on the serve. It uses the kinetic chain of movement, doesn’t it? And you start using your bottom muscles of your body and your core, then that translates into that throwing motion where you whip your arm, then the racquet and racquet head around your body to create more power.

One problem Farnell runs into is that the two teams usually play on Tuesdays. When the two sports overlap, Farnell will play tennis instead of baseball.

“The hardest part is definitely deciding what takes priority over what because I love both sports,” he said. “I went into the spring season thinking tennis was my main sport since I only pitch for baseball. I have decided that on Tuesdays – we always have tennis and baseball games – I will always play tennis. And then all the other baseball games I can do and then Thursday for tennis don’t overlap.

On the tennis court, Farnell was paired with Felix Schlegel, and it worked for the Miners. DeLong sees potential in this duo once the two juniors have more experience playing with each other.

“I think Jake was a natural fit for Felix at double No. 2,” DeLong said. “I think it was very important to have him, and once I realized that Jake and Felix were a great team, I played them every time. Hopefully they take this summer and keep going. to work on a doubles strategy and that they can enter next year as a doubles team.

Farnell didn’t play baseball last year, but this year he’s back on the mound coming out of the bullpen for Park City. Feasler liked what he saw from Farnell this season.

“He’s got a live arm, he’s got a really live arm, he’s got a good breaking ball,” Feasler said. “When he’s in the zone it’s really good, and he’s our bridge guy. He’s like our setup guy in Asher (Levine) to end the game. So Jake is a really important player for us.

The fate of Park City’s men’s baseball, track and field and tennis teams will be decided later this month. But McCurdy and Farnell will give their all no matter what team they play on.

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Athletics Performance Center Provides WVU Olympic Sports Athletes with State-of-the-Art Facility | WVU | West Virginia Mountaineers Sports Coverage https://lernersportsmarketing.com/athletics-performance-center-provides-wvu-olympic-sports-athletes-with-state-of-the-art-facility-wvu-west-virginia-mountaineers-sports-coverage/ Wed, 27 Apr 2022 19:47:46 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/athletics-performance-center-provides-wvu-olympic-sports-athletes-with-state-of-the-art-facility-wvu-west-virginia-mountaineers-sports-coverage/ Housed in the former Natatorium, the Athletics Performance Center’s weight room retains the pool’s original wooden ceiling. MORGANTOWN, W.VA — One year, $10 million, and 185 truckloads of cement later, the West Virginia University Athletics Performance Center is now complete and has quickly become a hub for student-athletes in the Olympic sports of mountaineering. WVU […]]]>

Housed in the former Natatorium, the Athletics Performance Center’s weight room retains the pool’s original wooden ceiling.

MORGANTOWN, W.VA — One year, $10 million, and 185 truckloads of cement later, the West Virginia University Athletics Performance Center is now complete and has quickly become a hub for student-athletes in the Olympic sports of mountaineering.

WVU football, baseball, and women’s and men’s basketball each already had their own strength and conditioning zones, but West Virginia’s other 13 college sports were left to practice in a pair of cramped and cramped weight rooms. obsolete in the Coliseum and Shell Building.

When Shane Lyons took over as WVU’s athletic director in 2015, his vision was to give these programs a modern training facility of their own.

Now this idea has become reality.

Located behind the Colosseum, the Athletic Performance Center, which opened last October, is used daily by 300 to 400 student-athletes from volleyball, archery, gymnastics, rowing, golf, athletics, tennis, wrestling, men’s and women’s swimming. and the diving, men’s soccer and women’s soccer teams.

“We got into this business because of student-athletes,” Lyons said. “We have high performing student-athletes and we want to help them improve. We want to give them access to first-class training, and with that in mind, it has become paramount that we build this facility for our Olympic sports athletes.

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The Athletics Performance Center resides on the site of the old Natatorium, which housed WVU’s swim program from 1972 to 2019. But when the state-of-the-art Aquatics Center opened in Mylan Park in October 2019, swimmers and Mountaineer divers had a new aquatic paradise and the Natatorium was empty. It sat unused until APC construction began in October 2020.

“When we started looking at this idea in 2016, we first talked about having a stand-alone building,” Lyons said of the initial plan for an athletics performance center that would also be near the Colosseum. “We originally envisioned using the Natatorium to build a 2,500-3,000 seat arena that we could use for volleyball, wrestling and gymnastics (who all hold their competitions at the Colosseum), giving them a more intimate setting. As we were looking at that, however, the seating capacity just wasn’t going to be there for that, so the next question – what do we do with this building? Talking to architects, they said we could fill the pool with concrete and use that space for our athletic performance center.

“It started to turn the wheels. We brought in Omni architects from Fairmont and showed us a rendering of what could be done,” Lyons said, as the project moved from WVU ideas to Omni plans to March-Westin construction. According to Lyons, 94% of the workers used to build the facility were from the state of West Virginia.

“It went better than we expected,” smiled Lyons.

WVU Director of Athletics Shane Lyons (middle) speaks to members of the media during a tour of the Athletics Performance Center

The cost to convert the Natatorium into the Athletics Performance Center was $10 million, with that money coming from the Hazel Ruby McQuain Charitable Trust.

“I can’t thank them enough,” said Lyons of the Trust, founded by the late Hazel Ruby McQuain, who died aged 92 in 2002. Over the years, the Trust has made multiple donations to the University. and the Morgantown community for various philanthropic purposes.

WVU got its money’s worth at APC.

The 36,500 square foot athletics performance center includes a 10,000 square foot weight room, which sits where the old pool used to be. The vaulted wooden ceiling that once stood above the swimming pool is now above the weight room, and it is one of the few original features of the Natatorium that still remains, although the ceiling has been gently cleaned after decades of exposure to humid chlorinated air.

There’s also an area where the 60-member women’s team can practice with individual rowers, and there’s a golf suite that contains an artificial-turf putting green and a computerized Trackman simulator for use when the weather isn’t. not allow. members of Sean Covich’s golf team to travel to his normal practice course, which is the Pete Dye Golf Club in Bridgeport.

There is also a Bod Pod, which is a $50,000 egg-shaped enclosure that uses air pressure to measure an individual’s body composition. Additionally, the facility contains a nutrition and hydration station, which is overseen by the sports department’s five nutritionists (two for football and three for other sports), although the cafeteria serving main meals remains at side in the Colosseum. There is also a treatment and rehabilitation wing with six full-time sports coaches and three student assistant coaches who look after the physical needs of the athletes. There’s a three-pool hydrotherapy room (temperatures of 50 degrees, 90 degrees, and 105 degrees) for low-stress conditioning (one of the pools has a pair of underwater treadmills) and more advanced rehabilitation .

In addition to all this, there are changing rooms for all Olympic sports athletes. It’s something that not all of them have appreciated before.

Not only does the Athletics Performance Center contain the state-of-the-art equipment that student-athletes in the Mountaineer Olympic sport need, but it is also large enough to allow almost any team to train at the same time, rather than to separate. as they had to do in the past when using the small weight rooms.

“It’s not only impacting student-athletes today, but it’s going to impact student-athletes for years to come,” Lyons concluded. “It lays a great foundation for us. This gives us something to be very proud of. It is one of our flagship buildings.

One of the Athletics Performance Center’s hydrotherapy pools contains a pair of treadmills submerged in 90-degree water.

The opening of the Athletic Performance Center allows Lyon to move on to their next domino. The new weight room of the APC leaves unused the old one which was at ground level in the Colosseum. WVU is already transforming this into a club area that can accommodate up to 150 basketball ticket holders. Following the completion of this field-level club area in August, West Virginia plans to move forward with another, even larger club area, to be built from the lobby level of the Coliseum near of the golden gate.

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Trisport athletes Blesi and Lescault have been inseparable since sophomore – Saratogian https://lernersportsmarketing.com/trisport-athletes-blesi-and-lescault-have-been-inseparable-since-sophomore-saratogian/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 23:42:04 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/trisport-athletes-blesi-and-lescault-have-been-inseparable-since-sophomore-saratogian/ BURNT HILLS, NY — MK Lescault and Ella Blesi have defined what it means to be a student-athlete, not in one or two sports, but in three. They did it all together. Lescault and Blesi have spent a lot of time together over the years. Since third grade, they’ve been through the throes of soccer, […]]]>

BURNT HILLS, NY — MK Lescault and Ella Blesi have defined what it means to be a student-athlete, not in one or two sports, but in three.

They did it all together.

Lescault and Blesi have spent a lot of time together over the years. Since third grade, they’ve been through the throes of soccer, basketball and lacrosse seasons.

“We see each other like every day,” Lescault said. “It just became a habit to be together all the time. Kiss on the sidelines; it is normal for us.

“My parents encouraged us to play sports, but we could always decide what we wanted to play,” Blesi said of the three sports.

For Burnt Hills women’s lacrosse coach Katie Kerner, they’re the ultimate “dynamic duo”. For Burnt Hills soccer coach Marisah Boucher, it’s “the dream team.” For Lescault’s mother, Melissa, they’re “fire and ice,” and for basketball coach Gary Bynon, they’re simply “winners.”

“First of all, they’re two amazing people and they’re amazing kids,” Bynon said of Blesi and Lescault. “They want to win so badly and they know you can’t win without a team. What they do, to represent our school district in all the sports they play; they’re great kids from great families and they know what what it means to compete.

2012 marked the start of the duo’s journey together in Burnt Hills United football, as second year pupils.

“I think the most important thing they both bring is their positive energy and their mindset,” Boucher explained. “Whether it’s practice or a game, they constantly push themselves and others to do their best. Their work ethic sets a standard for the rest of the team.

Not only do Lescault and Blesi push others to work harder, they also push each other to their limits.

“They have this indescribable connection on and off the pitch. They are best friends and they are competitors. They can fight and yell at each other and they do it because they try to get the best versions of each other,” Kerner said. “They want each other to be at their best. It’s a friendship they’re going to have for the rest of their lives and it’s really special to be able to watch it.

Currently, the pair of juniors are in the middle of their lacrosse season. The Spartans started with a 6-1 record. They lost their season opener to defending Class A Division 2 champions Bethlehem and went on to win six games in a row.

After falling to Queensbury in the Class B title game last year, the women’s lacrosse team is now back in Class C; the same division they were in during their triple section championship from 2017 to 2019.

Burnt Hills will get a rematch against the Northern Spartans on April 29 at home.

“I’m glad we’re back in Class C,” said Lescault, who was a member of the 2018 and 2019 squads. “Queensbury are a very good team and I don’t think we were ready for them last year. It felt like we were falling apart. They were definitely the better team. I think playing them this year in the regular season is going to be fun and we’re going to be ready for the rematch.

Of the three sports, lacrosse is by far the number one sport for Lescault, who is committed to playing Division I women’s lacrosse at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland.

“I think MK’s commitment to Hopkins and continuing to play football and basketball speaks to the nature of what it means to be a student-athlete at Burnt Hills,” Kerner said. “Just because she knew she was going to college for lacrosse didn’t mean she had to stop being an athlete wherever she could. She wants to do it all the time. It’s in his blood.

Being a tri-sport athlete is no picnic. Going to practices every day after school, devoting the extra time necessary to be in the best physical shape, participating in travel sports, in addition to school work; it takes a toll. This almost led Lescault to sacrifice one of his sports.

“I wanted to quit football at some point, but my mother wouldn’t let me,” Lescault said. “I really like football and I’m glad I kept playing.”

With only one football season left, she can’t stop now.

“Playing multiple sports helps kids learn different team dynamics and they can learn from multiple coaches,” Boucher said. “Each sport presents its own mental challenges and gives children the opportunity to overcome a variety of challenges they may encounter. They can benefit from multiple sports to reveal different strengths they might have. two identical football teams!Each team brings so many different opportunities and challenges for athletes and coaches.

Blesi, who has not yet committed to a university, has always considered herself a football player.

“I was actually told I was the best at lacrosse, but soccer is the sport I’ve been playing forever and I’ve always loved it,” said Blesi, who served as soccer captain for the season. last. “My dad played soccer in college and he was always my coach. It’s just the one I wanted to play in college.

Blesi has been exploring her options at the Division I and Division III college levels for soccer, though she hasn’t completely closed the door on playing soccer and lacrosse, should she move up to D3.

“At this point, I’m still trying to connect with coaches and see what would fit best,” she said.

Last winter, the junior duo helped break the status quo of the women’s basketball program. After years of non-competition, the Spartans were 14-9 overall and advanced to the Division 2 Class A Championship game where they fell to eventual state champion Averill Park. .

“Honestly, it was unreal,” Blesi said of the basketball season. “The year before, we were falling apart. We could barely play games because we didn’t know if we would have five people. Coach Bynon came along and completely changed the environment. Everyone loved to play and came to practice every day. It was so much fun. After the season ended, everyone kept saying how badly they had missed practice and wanted to get back to the gym. I don’t think our program has had that kind of energy in a while and our eyes were opened to just how good we could be.

“They play so many minutes and everyone has their own thing,” Bynon said of Blesi and Lescault. “Ella is that floor general there, who runs things. MK is the one who plays solid defense and we had to run her at one point. Really, I just call them four and five.

While Blesi keeps his number (five) the same in all three sports, Lescault changes his number. She is four years old in basketball, six years in soccer and zero in lacrosse.

“These two are the dream team. I feel lucky to have coached them,” Boucher added. “They are both high quality athletes because of their drive and desire to be better. than the day before. They hold themselves to very high standards and the team follows. I can’t wait to see what the future holds for both girls. They are sure to do great things.

The dynamic duo get a little break to play together over the summer. Although Lescault tried several times to get Blesi through, Lescault stuck to lacrosse during the summer and Blesi played travel football.

While there are certainly more memories to come, with the rest of their junior year and their entire senior year, there have already been plenty of memories that will last a lifetime.

“In seventh grade, we were playing travel basketball and we won the league championship,” Blesi recalled. “I remember having the ball at the end of the match. I threw it up and MK came over and hugged me. This is probably my favorite moment.

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Texas A&M’s Jimbo Fisher has no problem with dual-sport athletes https://lernersportsmarketing.com/texas-ams-jimbo-fisher-has-no-problem-with-dual-sport-athletes/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 23:18:22 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/texas-ams-jimbo-fisher-has-no-problem-with-dual-sport-athletes/ COLLEGE STATION — In an age of snowballing specialization, parents and private coaches steering youngsters to a single sport before they’re teenagers, Jimbo Fisher says it’s all about expanded fantasies. “Why do you want to punish someone for being good at two things?” wondered Fisher, the fifth-year football coach at Texas A&M. “It’s selfish of […]]]>

COLLEGE STATION — In an age of snowballing specialization, parents and private coaches steering youngsters to a single sport before they’re teenagers, Jimbo Fisher says it’s all about expanded fantasies.

“Why do you want to punish someone for being good at two things?” wondered Fisher, the fifth-year football coach at Texas A&M. “It’s selfish of us.”

His message? It’s all very well, mom and dad, that the children practice two sports (or more!). Fisher said he’s been a fan of high school and even college kids participating in at least two sports, because that’s exactly what he did at his home in Clarksburg, W.Va.

“I played all sports growing up,” he said.

That is, all the majors – football, basketball and baseball. Fisher briefly played baseball at Clemson before settling on his true love, football, at Salem and then Samford.

The two-sport issue arose this spring because Fisher was missing running back Devon Achane and starting center Bryce Foster for the Aggies’ annual spring game on April 9. Instead of lamenting their absence, Fisher praised Achane’s sprint times for A&M’s famed track team and the impressive shot putter Foster’s kick on the “court” side of things.

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Jimbo Fisher of Texas A&M, a fan of two-sport athletes https://lernersportsmarketing.com/jimbo-fisher-of-texas-am-a-fan-of-two-sport-athletes/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 07:00:00 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/jimbo-fisher-of-texas-am-a-fan-of-two-sport-athletes/ COLLEGE STATION — In an age of snowballing specialization, parents and private coaches steering youngsters to a single sport before they’re teenagers, Jimbo Fisher says it’s all about expanded fantasies. “Why do you want to punish someone for being good at two things?” wondered Fisher, the fifth-year football coach at Texas A&M. “It’s selfish of […]]]>

COLLEGE STATION — In an age of snowballing specialization, parents and private coaches steering youngsters to a single sport before they’re teenagers, Jimbo Fisher says it’s all about expanded fantasies.

“Why do you want to punish someone for being good at two things?” wondered Fisher, the fifth-year football coach at Texas A&M. “It’s selfish of us.”

His message? It’s all very well, mom and dad, that the children practice two sports (or more!). Fisher said he’s been a fan of high school and even college kids participating in at least two sports, because that’s exactly what he did at his home in Clarksburg, W.Va.

“I played all sports growing up,” he said.

That is, all the majors – football, basketball and baseball. Fisher briefly played baseball at Clemson before settling on his true love, football, at Salem and then Samford.

The two-sport issue arose this spring because Fisher was missing running back Devon Achane and starting center Bryce Foster for the Aggies’ annual spring game on April 9. Instead of lamenting their absence, Fisher praised Achane’s sprint times for A&M’s famed track team and the impressive shot putter Foster’s kick on the “court” side of things.

“I’m happy for these guys,” Fisher said. “…We should be able to solve the problem and figure it out for the best development of this young man. You sacrifice a bit when it comes to development, but overall it’s about the kids.

What is lacking in the development of one sport is more than made up for by the competitive advantages of the second sport, Fisher believes. He believes that if a score is kept and the juices are flowing and wins and losses are on the line, those are collectively more important in the long run than extra off-season work in a main sport.

“If they’re good at two sports, it’s not their fault,” said Fisher, who also believes that if they’re only average at one effort, they should focus on one sport. “Why shouldn’t they do it, that’s how I see it.”

Fisher’s all-time example of excelling at both may always be quarterback Jameis Winston at Florida State. In the spring of 2013, Winston, then a proper freshman who had worn a redshirt the previous fall under Fisher, completed 12 of 15 passes for 205 yards in the Seminoles’ annual spring game, including a 58 touchdown. yards on his first sling.

Winston, also a power pitcher, then took a shower and walked on the concrete to Dick Howser Stadium in his baseball uniform, where he hit for FSU against Duke in a baseball game. ACC the same day (finishing 1 for 2 at home plate).

“Jameis was a great example of that,” Fisher said of the rare ability to shine in two sports in college. “He was going to be a first-round or second-round baseball guy, just like he was with football. It could have gone either way.

Later that fall, Winston led the football team to the 2013 national title, and just over a year later was the No. 1 overall selection in the 2015 NFL Draft.

Foster and Achane at the start of their college career plans as high NFL draft picks and will likely make most of their money playing football.

But that hasn’t diminished their love for athletics in the meantime.

“Jimbo and I were at LSU at the same time,” said A&M track and field coach Pat Henry, who was the Tigers’ head coach at the same time Fisher was assistant to LSU football coach Nick Saban. . “We had a relationship and we recruited these types of guys to LSU. If you start this and it… snowballs, then (suddenly) you’re bringing in some really talented guys who are elite in athletics and great at football.

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JeyQuan Smith is one of the region’s top dual-sport athletes https://lernersportsmarketing.com/jeyquan-smith-is-one-of-the-regions-top-dual-sport-athletes/ Tue, 19 Apr 2022 03:39:37 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/jeyquan-smith-is-one-of-the-regions-top-dual-sport-athletes/ San Bernardino (California) Large Cajon Jey Quan Smith is one of the best two-sport athletes in the region. Smith is one of the fastest players in the state and will be running at the top level with football. As a sophomore, he had personal bests of 10.55 in 100 m […]]]>



San Bernardino (California) Large Cajon Jey Quan Smith is one of the best two-sport athletes in the region.


Smith is one of the fastest players in the state and will be running at the top level with football. As a sophomore, he had personal bests of 10.55 in 100 m and 21.39 in 200 m.


He has a pair of 10.63 100m times this season and it should be fun to see what kind of times he can achieve towards the end of the season.


Smith’s explosiveness also appears on football. He rushed 18 times for 222 yards (12.3 ave) and two touchdowns, caught 33 balls for 712 yards and seven other scores, and added 216 more yards on kickoff returns.


He is a unique attacking player and can be used in different ways. He will perform end turns and throws out of the backfield and get a ton of yards after the catch playing in the slot.


He’s an improving pass catcher and as he continues to become more consistent and natural at catching the ball, his game will take off to another level. You just don’t find many players with his kind of game-breaking ability who have the speed to score from anywhere on the pitch.


On the recruiting front, Smith received early scholarship offers from Ole Miss, Oregon, Penn State, Washington and Washington State, but said the Cougars were the main school talking to him right now.


“I was hearing a lot about Oregon too, but not as much,” Smith said. “I talk to UW here and there, but most of these schools I haven’t spoken to since they proposed.


“Washington State is always tough and I have a good relationship with the coaching staff. I think you have to show love to whoever loves you so I want to go there for sure but I don’t I haven’t had a chance to set anything up yet.

With his track schedule, Smith said it was difficult trying to find time to lock in tours.


“The track is the priority right now and will be until late May or early June,” Smith said. “I’m not planning on making a decision early anyway, so I’m in no rush right now.

“I’m going to wait until my final year and that will also allow me to see what all my options are at that time. I know things can always change in recruiting so I’m taking things slowly and will play the game. process .”

Smith is currently ranked No. 462 nationally in the 247Sports Composite and No. 32 in the state.

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Multisport Athletes Who Caught Our Eye This Spring – Broomfield Enterprise https://lernersportsmarketing.com/multisport-athletes-who-caught-our-eye-this-spring-broomfield-enterprise/ Sat, 16 Apr 2022 23:14:01 +0000 https://lernersportsmarketing.com/multisport-athletes-who-caught-our-eye-this-spring-broomfield-enterprise/ New Broncos quarterback Russell Wilson used to go deep with a bat in hand. Denver Nuggets first-round opponent Stephen Curry also takes aim with precision on his golf shot. Multisport athletes. They are everywhere you look. But since specialization (and big money) often comes into play at the college and professional levels, high school is […]]]>

New Broncos quarterback Russell Wilson used to go deep with a bat in hand. Denver Nuggets first-round opponent Stephen Curry also takes aim with precision on his golf shot.

Multisport athletes. They are everywhere you look.

But since specialization (and big money) often comes into play at the college and professional levels, high school is where the interchangeable star can thrive the most.

As the spring season nears its halfway point, here are some BoCoPreps.com spring athletes who have also made a name for themselves elsewhere in the sport.

Claire Adams, Sr., Mead: She finished a stellar high school softball career in the fall, hitting .624 in her senior season while holding a 3.27 ERA in 40 2/3 innings pitched. Now her swing can be seen on the golf courses, where she scores for the varsity team.

Grayson Arnold, Sr., Holy Family: Arnold compiled some stats for Holy Family football in the fall. Most notably, a recovered fumble in a seven-point win over Pueblo South. In athletics, he is at the forefront. Then whoosh, faded away. Heading into the weekend, Arnold clocked the state’s fastest 200 meters (21.64 seconds) and second fastest 100 meters (10.77).

Annabelle Biggar, Jr., Dawson: A standout on the women’s lacrosse field this spring, “Biggar is Better” helped fuel a strong start for the Mustangs, scoring 25 goals in the team’s first four games. In the winter, she led the women’s basketball team with 14.7 points per game and 7.4 boards.

Ty Chandler, Sr., Boulder: Chandler has 11 goals in nine games for Boulder Lacrosse, which has won three of its last four games. A footballer too, he had 11 receptions and 22 tackles for the Panthers in the fall.

Bryce Conover, Sr., Frederick: The campus big man was a standout basketball player who in March helped Frederick advance to the state semifinals for the first time in 66 years. He was also the school’s starting quarterback last fall, and now he’s producing on the baseball field with 11 RBIs coming this weekend.

Jenna Joseph, Sr., Longmont/Mead: Wrestling and golf. What a combo. Joseph won the 161-pound title for Mead in February and can now be seen on the links for the Longmont women’s golf team. Not that she would, but arguing during her backswing seems misguided.

Josh Dunn, Sr., Broomfield: Dunn, what didn’t he do? … A handy fruit for the author of infertile titles, Dunn’s ceiling in sports is far beyond. The senior has played four sports during the pandemic. An outstanding receiver in football, he was also a major contributor to the winter basketball team. The CSU-Pueblo football commitment is currently a hindrance in athletics.

Derek Duplechin, Jr., Broomfield/Monarque: The 6-foot-4 junior has proven he can shoot as well as shoot during the lacrosse season. He bounced back nicely after getting his head drilled against Lakewood on Monday. He leads the team with 24 goals this season. In the winter, he averaged 6.9 points and 3.3 boards for Broomfield basketball.

Chrisly Kelly-Cannon, Jr., Jefferson Academy: Kelly-Cannon currently holds a top five in the state in the 100 and 200 dashes. In the fall, he was a quick weapon for the football program, scoring nine times as the Jags reached the 3A state title game.

Ava Kuszak, Sr., Holy Family: The Wisconsin softball commitment is a four-time high school state champion. She won three with the school’s titan softball program and was part of the football team that clinched a 4A title last year as the 12th seed. Late last month, she scored with 29 seconds left to beat Erie for the team’s first win of the season.

Aidan Miller, Sr., Silver Creek: Averaging 7.3 points and 4.2 boards for the basketball team, the 6-7 senior is now an integral part of the Raptors jump team in track and field.

Andrew Muncy, Sr., Skyline: Muncy had 22 catches in the fall for the school football team and scored four touchdowns. Now his speed is settling on the track, where he entered the weekend with Colorado’s fastest 400 time (49.05) in 2022.

Kaelan Norgard, father, monarch: Norgard finished 15th at the Front Range League Women’s Golf Tournament on Tuesday, shooting a solid 21 over the par-91. In the winter, she was a multifaceted swimmer who won three races, according to MaxPreps.

Corby Tecu, Sr., Mead/Erie: Tecu has already bid farewell to the senior season. First helping lead Mead football to the state title game and then getting Mavericks basketball back to the quarterfinals, he’s a spring juggernaut for the Erie lacrosse team, which is currently ranked second in Class 4A. Tecu committed to Drexel University for lacrosse.

Brandon Sanchez, Jr., Legacy: Sanchez is a running back/wide receiver/defensive back threat on the school’s football roster. In the spring, he is an outstanding player. Heading into the weekend, he led the Lightning 9-0 with a .562 batting average and 16 RBIs.

Samuel Thengvall, Sr., Peak to Peak: A producer on the soccer field in the fall, in basketball in the winter, Thengvall is now trying his hand at center tackle for the Pumas’ first-year men’s volleyball program. As a snapshot of his latest venture, he made a series of shrewd net bashings that helped the Pumas secure a crucial league win over Poudre on Tuesday.

Ava Welty, Sr., and Mia Welty, Jr., Erie/Fairview: The sisters were key members of Erie women’s basketball in the winter, with Ava averaging 6.8 ppg and Mia 7.9. This spring they are part of the 5A No. 4 Fairview lacrosse team. At the start of the weekend, Mia scored 12 goals and Ava had two goals and two assists.

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